Population growth, technological adoption and economic outcomes
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Population growth, technological adoption and economic outcomes a theory of cross-country differences for the information era by Paul Beaudry

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Population geography -- Economic aspects.,
  • Information technology -- Economic aspects.,
  • Labor supply -- Effect of technological innovations on.,
  • Human capital.,
  • Skilled labor.,
  • Technological innovations -- Economic aspects.,
  • Industrial productivity -- Effect of technological innovations on.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementPaul Beaudry, David A. Green.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 8149, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 8149.
ContributionsGreen, David A., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination64, [6] p. :
Number of Pages64
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22417173M

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  Beaudry, P. and, Green, D. , Population Growth, Technological Adoption and Economic Outcomes: A Theory of Cross-Country Differences for the Information Era, NBER Working Paper Google ScholarCited by: Get this from a library! Population growth, technological adoption and economic outcomes: a theory of cross-country differences for the information era. [Paul Beaudry; David A Green; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- The object of this paper is to show how population growth, through its interaction with recent technological and organizational developments, can account for many of . Population Growth, Technological Adoption and Economic Outcomes: A Theory of Cross-Country Differences for the Information Era. " Population Growth, Technological Adoption and Eco-nomic Outcomes: A Theory of Cross-Country Differences for the Information Era, " NBER Working Paper .

Paul Beaudry & David A. Green, "Population Growth, Technological Adoption, and Economic Outcomes in the Information Era," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages , October. Population Growth, Technological Adoption and Economic Outcomes: A Theory of Cross-Country Differences for the Information Era. By Paul Beaudry and David Green. Get PDF (1 MB) Abstract. The object of this paper is to show how population growth, through its interaction with recent technological and organizational developments, can account for. A delicate balance to sustain economic growth Chapter 3 technology adoption making the continent fertile for innovation. Economic dynamism meaning that education outcomes are worsening for. book Full Recovery or Stagnation? Hansen drew on the macroeconomic ideas of John Maynard Keynes in fearing that economic growth was over, with popula-tion growth and technological innovation exhausted. Keynes was also drawn into the debate and offered a meditation on the future of technology and unemploy-.

Paul Beaudry & David Green, "Population Growth, Technological Adoption and Economic Outcomes: A Theory of Cross-Country Differences for the Information Era," NBER Working Papers , National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. Peter Gottschalk & Timothy M. Smeeding, The conclusion that rapid population growth has slowed development is by no means straightfor-ward or clearcut (see Box ). Under certain condi-tions moderate population growth can be benefi-cial. As Chapter 4 showed, in Europe, Japan, and North America economic growth has been accom-panied by moderate population growth, which.   The relationship between population growth and growth of economic output has been studied extensively (Heady & Hodge, ).Many analysts believe that economic growth in high-income countries is likely to be relatively slow in coming years in part because population growth in these countries is predicted to slow considerably (Baker, Delong, & Krugman, ). A growing population leads to an increasing total output. But “it also makes for a greater number of persons among whom this output must be are more productive hands but there are also more mouths to feed.” The effect of population growth on a society’s per capita output level depends on the pattern of population growth as also its institutional (organ­isational) framework.